In 2008, her work was selected for sale at expositions

the first being the Xihe Qiqiao Cultural Festival, and it proved to be highly popular with tourists.

Soon, she began to take orders, and then recruited locals to work for her.

“As my life improves, I want to help others

to make better lives for themselves through their embroidery,” says Zhang.

In 2015, with the help of her family, she built a house to be used as a work site and named it Qiqiao Workshop.

At first, she recruited a dozen members. After that the num

ber has kept growing as the factory developed into an infl

uential embroidery organization, the Qiqiao Workshop Association.

By last year, it had 179 women as members, 30 of w

hom were from registered poverty-stricken households. It h

ad reached a turnover of 1 million yuan by last year, and members earned 4,000 yuan on average.

www.ash01.com

Members also carry on doing their other tasks, such as far

ming, cooking, taking care of children and household chores, and pick up pins and needles only in their free time.

“Apart from being able to increase their incomes, what is noticeable is that the women finally have a say in their family decisions now,” says Zhang.

“Earlier, they used to feel that they needed to ask their husbands even if they just w

anted to buy a 10-yuan sweater. But now, they feel free to make their own choices.”

In 2016, the China Women’s Federation designated Xihe county as the model base for alle

viating poverty and began to offer financial support to the likes of Qiqiao Workshop.

One of the beneficiaries was Lyu Xiaohong, the founder of the Baoji Embroidery Culture Company.

The federation encourages poor households to become shareholders by allocating each

of them an equity of 5,000 yuan. At the same time, Lyu’s company signed an agreement with the hou

seholds, promising a dividend of not less than 1,000 yuan by the end of each year. Now, 36 poor households in the v

illage, more than half of such households there, have decided to join the company.

ash01.com

HK, Macao legal workers to be arbitrators in Guangzhou

Legal professionals from Hong Kong and Macao will be allowed to work as arbitrators in Nansha district of Guangz

hou as part of an effort by Guangdong province to strengthen cooperation with the two special administrative regions.

Nansha lies within the Guangdong Pilot Free Trade Zone.

The Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security has approved the introduction of the legal professionals, who

will work at the Court of Arbitration for Labor and Personnel Disputes to settle competing claims.

Sources at the court said the Hong Kong-and Macao-based arbitrators will be signific

ant in promoting the business environment of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area.

“It will help provide high-quality, efficient and fast legal services for busine

sses, especially those whose investors include companies from Hong Kong and Macao,” the court said on Tuesday.

According to the development plan outline for the Greater Bay Area, which was unveiled on Mond

ay, Nansha district will develop into a pilot zone for closer overall cooperation in exchanges of h

uman resources, goods, materials, funds and information between Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao.

The court said the first group of labor arbitrators from Hong Kong and Macao will be appointed in late 2019.

vzmla.cn

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) will

give full play to its advantages and seek complementary and mutually beneficial cooperation on inn

ovation and technology in the development of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Ba

y Area, an official of the HKSAR government said in a recent interview with Xinhua.

The Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area aims at building a globally influenti

al international innovation and technology hub, and Hong Kong’s role should be “capitalizing its

strengths to serve the country’s needs,” the HKSAR government’s Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nic

holas Yang said Tuesday, one day after China unveiled an outline development plan for the Greater Bay Area.

To build an international innovation and technology hub, Hong Kong has multiple advantages due to its world-class uni

versities, high international recognition and relatively low financing cost, according to Yang.

Home to four of the world‘s top 100 universities, Hong Kong i

s well recognized for its basic scientific research, he said, adding that the newly un

veiled outline development plan may encourage other elite universities around the globe to upgrade cooperation w

www.xvsic.cn

While the experience of teaching on Chinese campuses is

 often different to that in the West due to the prevalence of a more tradit

ional intellectual culture, the dedication of students and their zest for acquiring kno

wledge makes teaching a unique pleasure. Most faculty members find that their students are happy to adopt the Soc

ratic methods favored in Western education, encouraging a rewarding level of debate in the classroom.

An important factor that makes the process of adaptation easier for faculty members is pre

cisely the existence of joint-venture universities and other similar types of degree-granting coll

aborative projects, which allow them to remain within a Western-style administrative and academic structure whi

le becoming embedded in a different culture and sociocultural living experience.

Having a highly networked knowledge platform in China also provides scholars from interna

tional universities a chance to build bridges with Chinese counterparts, and to tackle problems to

gether in a more cohesive manner, which is essential for addressing today’s pressing global problems.

www.qigwf.cn

NYPD hate crimes task force investigating Nazi drawings

  The New York Police Department’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating Nazi drawings found Friday morning at an elementary school in Queens, Detective George Tourovakas told CNN.

  Dozens of swastikas, a Nazi eagle and the words “Hail Hitler” (sic) were found drawn in chalk on the pavement of PS 139’s schoolyard.

  Councilwoman Karen Koslowitz, who represents the district, told CNN her office received photographs from a resident in the apartment building next to t

he school and immediately informed the police. According to Koslowitz, the area is a predominately Jewish neighborhood.

  I am horrified, disgusted, and nauseated, to say the least, of what I have witnessed today. Naz

i imagery and anti-Semitic slurs were drawn at the PS 139 Playground in Rego Park. I was on the sce

ne today and most of the imagery has been washed away. Enough is enough! pic.twitter.com/vteXmlqQyk

  ”This was exceptionally scary today,” Koslowitz said, describing the images as “horrible, just horrible.”

  Koslowitz told CNN she heard stories from her mother, who came from Poland, about anti-Semitic incidents in Europe in the

last century. Koslowitz, who grew up in New York, said she never believed an act of this nature could occur in the city.

  ”This really just has to stop,” she said. “There’s no question about it being a hate crime.”

  There have been 36 anti-Semitic crimes reported in the city so this year, compared

with 21 for the same time last year, according to a New York Times report, which cited police.

www.shlfae.com

If an investigator comes to your door and asks to speak

  to you, please ask to see their badge and not their rosary,” she said.

  The Archdiocese of Detroit took issue with Nessel’s “broad generalizations” during Thursday’s press conference.

  Since 2002, the archdiocese has reported all accusations of clergy sexual abuse to law

enforcement and has not entered into any non-disclosure agreements with victims, said spokesman Ned McGrath.

  ”The Archdiocese of Detroit does not self-police,” McGrath said.

  Related: Vatican faces growing list of scandals

  US momentum against church builds amid summit

  The Michigan investigation of clergy sexual abuse in the Catholic Church is joined by a fe

deral investigation and similar probes in at least 12 other states and the District of Columbia.

  The investigations follow a damning report released by a grand jury in Pennsylvania last Augu

st that accused more than 300 “predator priests” of sexually abusing more than 1,000 children in six dioceses since 1947. The vas

t majority of cases occurred before Catholic bishops in the US instituted new child-safety protocols.

shlfbbb.com

This allowed Moros to be a survivor as the environment

  nged. For 15 million years, tyrannosaurs were restricted to this smaller size before evolvin

g into giants (about 12 feet tall and 11,000 to 15,500 pounds) over a 16 million-year period.

  ”Although the earliest Cretaceous tyrannosaurs were small, their predatory specializations mea

nt that they were primed to take advantage of new opportunities when warming tem

peratures, rising sea-level and shrinking ranges restructured ecosystems at the beginning of the Late Cr

etaceous,” Zanno said. “We now know it took them less than 15 million years to rise to power.”

  Moros is most closely related to tyrannosaurs from Asia, which helped the researchers trace the dinosaurs’ lineage. Thi

s means Moros crossed the Alaskan land bridge during the Early Cretaceous to reach North America.

  ”T. rex and its famous contemporaries such as Triceratops may be among our most beloved cultural ico

ns, but we owe their existence to their intrepid ancestors who migrated here from Asia at least 30 million years prior,” Za

nno said. “Moros signals the establishment of the iconic Late Cretaceous ecosystems of North America.”

www.qianhuavc.com

Within Japan, every professional person I speak to is bemused

  by Brexit,” said Paul Bacon, a professor at Tokyo’s Waseda University who specializes in Japan’s relations with Europe. “It

is obvious here how economically damaging it will be, and also that it creates serious difficulties for Japan

ese industry.”Britain is set to leave the European Union in less than 40 days, but Prime Minister Theresa May has failed to

secure parliamentary backing for her plan for what happens next, heightening fears of a disorderly departure.

  That’s infuriating for Japanese businesses and government officials, who have been aski

ng for years for reassurances that British leaders would limit the harmful effects of Brexit.

  The “trust has evaporated” between Japanese companies and the UK government, s

aid Seijiro Takeshita, a professor at the University of Shizuoka’s School of Management and Information.

  apan Inc has poured billions into the UK economy. More than 1,000 Japanese companies do bus

iness in the country, supporting more than 140,000 jobs, according to the most recent Japanese government figures.

  Many of them used the United Kingdom as a launchpad into Europe. But if the country

exits the EU’s unified market, “it makes no sense for Japanese industries to base themselves in the UK,” Bacon said.

  Around 60% of Japanese firms in the United Kingdom surveyed by the Japan External Trade Or

ganization in the fall of 2018 said they expected Brexit to have a negative impact on their future business.

www.aishedesb.com

They now work with over 100 different suppliers from across

  the country, sourcing the best of the best for everything from game meats to that addictive Irish b

utter. “The idea there was to get the best produce that we can within Ireland,” says Heery.Spread acr

oss the sprawling property are four different restaurants, each catering to a specific mood or type of guest.

  The Oak Room is Adare’s fine-dining option, housed inside a stunningly renovated oak-pa

neled dining room. Local artists were even commissioned to design bespoke wood and ceramic plates a

nd serving pieces, with some of the material coming from the hotel’s own woodlands.

  A six-course, prix-fixe menu with wine pairing will set guests back €250 (ab

out $283) per person. The meal includes elevated takes on traditional Irish fare like

Tipperary quail with salsify and bacon, or 24-hour-cooked Dexter beef with truffles and morel mushrooms. A

nd, of course, service is top notch.For those looking for a more traditional experience, the hotel’s Gallery serves a p

roper Irish afternoon tea that will upend all expectations (and probably ruin you for any version thereafter).

  Guests are treated to a selection of four petite sandwiches, including local salmon and ham; freshly baked scones with

clotted cream; and five different desserts like a tiramisu “shot” filled with coffee jelly and mascarpone mousse.

  The room itself is also mighty impressive: based on the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles

it’s 132 feet long with gargantuan marble fireplaces and walls decorated with hand-carved Bible scenes.

www.ashchc.com